Hiking Mt. Evans

On this hike up to to Mt. Evans I had a real live action figure to accompany me, my cousin Daniel. The plan was the following: Day 1 – Park our rental car and start out at Echo Lake (elevation 10,750). We would then take the Chicago Lakes Trail and camp at the lower Chicago lake.  Day 2 – Push to Summit lake which is a steep ascent (12,830ft/3911m) and camp there. Day 3 – Summit Mt. Evans (14,265 ft/4,348 m) and walk our way back down to the car. ———————————————————————————————————————— Day 1 was tough but enjoyable. Shortness of breath was felt, heart rates were very elevated, and headaches were felt. For those interested in the full symptoms of  altitude sickness you can get a great overview from the national library of medicine. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000133.htm Day 2 – After a rough night of very little sleep, the cough started and the headaches were pounding.…

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Overheating on Mt. Washington

On a trip to Mt Washington I listened to the suggested gear list and over dressed for the occasion. Mt. Washington is known for it’s strong winds, and extreme weather patterns. In fact it is the site of the highest wind speed ever observed by man. However, that day was an unseasonably warm day in mid April. Despite me removing various layers and opening all my vents, I overheated. The base layer I was wearing was a mid weight wool layer, something not intended to be worn in such weather. The culmination was the pyrotechnic explosion below.   Early Warning Signs of Overheating    There I blow! A special thanks to Sing for being smart and quick enough to capture this beautiful moment.   For those interested in information on overheating can be found below. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000056.htm

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My nemesis the cactus

While on a trip in Arizona I had my first run in with a cactus. I was off solo exploring cave dwellings that I learned about speaking to ranger at the Tonto National Monument. After this conversation, I knew I wanted to head off and find some. So I asked him for some directions and set off in the direction he indicated in my rental car. As I drove I spotted and obvious example of a cave dwelling. They are identifiable by the soot on the face of the rock above the opening and dark ceiling. This stain comes from the fires set by inhabitants to keep themselves warm. The hike up the hill seemed trivial so I left my bag, knife, etc. I would come to regret leaving that knife… I easily hiked up avoiding the cacti along the way. Once up top I explored the first cave opening…

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Ticks like me

That little dot on my eyelid is not a mole. This is a tick that decided this was a good place to feed. I found this tick after a multiday hike in Guatemala to El Tigre and La Danta pyramids. I can’t tell you how difficult it was to pluck this puppy with only one eye open. Fun fact! One loses depth perception when you only have one eye available so I was poking myself for a good 20 minutes with my tweezers.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_perception

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