Day 263 – Torres del Paine – Day 3 of 10

Today was going to be shorter than yesterday (8k/5 miles) but today I had all my stuff to take with me. While eating breakfast I finally was able to get a clear shot of this little sparrow that has a little Mohawk. I’ve seen them everywhere down here but they don’t stay still long enough to get them in focus and get a good look at their stylish bird doo. Some of them have an orange patch around their necks. I’ll try to get a shot of that one in the future.

Rufous-collared Sparrow

Rufous-collared Sparrow

Stylin Rufous-collared Sparrow

Stylin Rufous-collared Sparrow

The hike up was inclined gaining 430m ( about 1,400 feet) and the hottest day I’ve been exposed to since getting here. I took very few photos on the way up. I was probably too eager to get to the top to finally see the towers.

Acencio river below

Acencio river below

I made it up in about 3hrs and 15 minutes. I checked in with the park ranger, pitched my tent, and ate a quick meal before heading up to the Torres with my day pack. Once there I just soaked them in as condors soared above. It was truly gratifying and a fulfilling experience since just about 2 years ago I was here and unable to even see the glacial lake. The reason, a pretty strong snowfall.

Paine Massif

Paine Massif

More views of fhe Paine Massif

More views of fhe Paine Massif

Paine Massif

Close up of the Paine Massif

Paine Joy

Paine Joy

While sitting and enjoying the views I noticed a cute little bird on the talus and was successful in getting a good close up of it.

Small bird on talus - Torres del Paine

Small bird on talus – Torres del Paine

I sat for at least an hour before making my way back down to camp and concluded my fulfilling day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments:

  1. First, I have to say how incredibly gorgeous the landscape is and once again reiterate my extreeeeeeeme envy. 😉

    Second, I *love* the rufous collared sparrow sighting! I realize that these are a South American bird, and therefore not really that uncommon there (sparrows are pretty ubiquitous the world over), but it’s a variety that this (extreme novice) North American birder will probably never see. There was a big fuss surrounding one that was found in Georgetown, CO about five years ago (was it a vagrant just really that far from home? had it escaped from captivity?). Here’s a link here to an ABA blog post about that particular bird.

    • Annie,

      Sorry for the delay in responding. I have been moving lots and if it wasn’t for the fact that I started a post schedule, there would be nothing new. Right now I find myself in Coyhaique Chile where there is good wifi. Tomorrow off to Chiloe on a 28hr ferry.

      I have always liked sparrows, even the more boring ones back home. I always found them cute when they’d roll around in the dirt. The ones out here are very cool looking. Some are more colorful than others (not just by male and female) and the mohawk varies in size significantly. Thanks for the article! It’s funny that it caused such a commotion but it’s understandable. If it somehow wound up there on it’s own and was not transplanted, it would be quite the feat.

      I hope the snow is treating you well! 🙂

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