Parque Cretacico (Cal Orck’o)

The Parque Cretacico or Cal Orck’o park is currently on the UNESCO’s tentative list. The place is absolutely remarkable. It’s known for its preserved dinosaur footprints. I’ve seen several other dinosaur footprints before but the way this historic record has been left to us is insane, a sheer vertical wall of footprints… No need for a display case, or for you to walk over planks and peer over the prints. These are right in your face.  I took a local bus from town and wound up chatting up an Australian family that was heading there as well. Their daughter that was about 10 and had never known a life other than travel. These parents were also long term travelers. I am always impressed when I see families traveling in that way since logistically speaking, it is harder to do. Although having traveled with a family that had a 5 year…

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Cerro Rico

The whole reason I came to Potosi was to visit Cerro Rico. Up until this point, I had never visited a mine. I have visited plenty of caves and I was interested to see how an artificial underground system stacked up to a natural one. Also I was curious as to the conditions inside the mines and how the miners worked. I booked a tour in town after reading different reviews and walking into a few places. Our group was a small group of 3. A guy from California, and man from Moscow.  Cerro Rico Mining Tour The tour started by getting us dressed into this fashionable miner attire. It’s remarkable that I was not solicited looking this sexy. After we were dressed, we are taken to the miners market. It’s basically a street in Potosi that has different shops that sell things that miners use. It’s not a market…

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Potosi

I decided to visit potosi because I wanted to visit Cerro Rico a mine that has a historic and huge economic influence on potosi and the region. I learned about this particular location through the UNESCO interactive map. I use it sometimes to find things that I otherwise might not encounter. Some of their sites are well known and visited, and others less so.  The altitude of Potosi is 13,420 feet so hiking around with my full backpack was a challenging endeavor. It took me a long time to find accommodations that I felt were reasonably priced. As I discovered, the prices in Potosi were around double of what I was paying in La Paz. I wound up choosing a place that was priced more than my room back in La Paz and had no internet. 🙁 I figured, compared to the prices of the other places I had found, it…

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Puma Punku

Puma Punku is one of my favorite sectors of Tiwanaku. The artistry and craftsmanship to achieve the level of precision that you see here is remarkable. For those interested in the other areas of Tiwanaku, I covered those in my previous post on Tiwanaku.  The H’s of Puma Punku A lot of these H’s are very similar in size and they feel like they interlock with each other. None are found interlocked but the symmetry makes you wonder if they were interlocked at some point in time. When you look at the back of them, it almost seems like the channel in the back is designed to slide the bottom part of the H into it. Perhaps it’s just my over active imagination 🙂 Concentric Stonework I think this is where a lot of people lose their minds. Look at how beautiful and precise these are.  Are they perfect? No…

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Tiwanaku

Sun Gate Tiwanaku

One of the most exciting things about being in La Paz was knowing that I could get to Tiwanaku from there. Tiwanaku is a UNESCO World Heritage archeological site that has amazing stone masonry. Some of it’s iconic features are the Semi Subterranean Temple, the Kalasasaya Temple, the Sun Gate, and Puma Punku. The corners, incuts, and carvings are all very impressive here. Also, while this is a little cheesy, this site was covered on a show called ancient aliens. Since seeing the site on this show, my interest in visiting this site grew considerably. The premise of this show is that sites like this are evidence of intelligent life having visited our world and helped with its development. It’s a fun thought to have when walking around the complex. Those interested in reading about the site can read up on the UNESCO World Heritage or Wikipedia. It makes no sense for…

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