My Life in Sucre

My Apartment I bounced around a little bit before settling into my “home” in Sucre. After two hostels, I wound up in a fantastic Airbnb which was only $10 bucks a night. This is what my room looked like. I also had a little table in the corner where I could work from. Downstairs I had a fully stocked kitchen and my own bathroom. I made decent use of the kitchen which allowed me to save on meal expenses to compensate for a higher nightly rate than I was paying in other parts of Sucre. The few extra bucks a night were well worth it though. It was also pretty cool to have this wooden spiral staircase. I am proud to announce I only ate it once going up and down for about a month. Those are good vegas odds! The apartment had 3 bedrooms. There was a Kiwi that…

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Fuente del Bicentenario (Bicentennial Fountain of Sucre)

Who the hell writes a post about a fountain? I do. The Fuente del Bicentenario in Sucre was one of the things that brought me a lot of joy. I told a slew of people to visit and took a few friends for the experience. I even wound up reading way too much about fountain controller systems because of my curiousity about it. So if you hate musical fountains, then just go ahead and skip this post.  The fountain mostly runs on weekends although there were some exceptions. It is located in parque Simon Bolivar.  My favorite songs of the mix Other songs I recorded Behind the Mist One of the many days I sat in front of the fountain, I saw the man from the control booth emerge. It was the first time that I had seen the door open. I couldn’t resist. I walked over and asked the guy…

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Uyuni

I am posting this earlier than normal because it’s not a very riveting post. In fact it almost didn’t go up. There is little to get excited about in Uyuni. The only thing that’s really interesting in Uyuni proper was the topic of my last post, the train graveyard. So why do people visit Uyuni? It’s because tours to the largest salt flats in the world leave from here. Unfortunately when I arrived there were several snow storms that closed a large portion of the reserve. I didn’t want to pay a fortune to experience part of the trip so I hung around this dusty city. What I did as I waited for better weather? I wrote a ton for the blog. I read a bunch. I listened to a ton of podcasts. I got the zipper on my jeans fixed by the market. I extended my Bolivian visa an…

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Cerro Rico

The whole reason I came to Potosi was to visit Cerro Rico. Up until this point, I had never visited a mine. I have visited plenty of caves and I was interested to see how an artificial underground system stacked up to a natural one. Also I was curious as to the conditions inside the mines and how the miners worked. I booked a tour in town after reading different reviews and walking into a few places. Our group was a small group of 3. A guy from California, and man from Moscow.  Cerro Rico Mining Tour The tour started by getting us dressed into this fashionable miner attire. It’s remarkable that I was not solicited looking this sexy. After we were dressed, we are taken to the miners market. It’s basically a street in Potosi that has different shops that sell things that miners use. It’s not a market…

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Train Graveyard in Uyuni

The highlight of being in Uyuni was the Train Graveyard. Those of you that know me know I like to go into abandoned places and this graveyard fit the bill. It was not necessarily abandoned but it had the qualities of decay, that I find fascinating about these places. The Journey to the Train Graveyard I looked at my maps.me app and walked towards the graveyard. It was a dusty journey and felt like a scene from an old western. At times I would be whipped by the sand-filled wind. All that was missing were tumbleweeds. Sadly, there was a ton of garbage along the way. There were these deposits as well as a collection of little shrubs that were covered in plastic bags. The wind would carry the bag and they would eventually get impaled on the shrubs. Not exactly good for their photosynthesis.  Arrival to the train graveyard…

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