Amboro National Park – Day 2

Out of all the days of hiking through Amboro, today would be the longest. We would have both hiking during the day and night. There are some animals that are more present at night and we wanted to try to see them.

The day started after our breakfast. Some of the stuff was repetitive but this red blooming tree was new.

Red bloom tree - Amboro National Park

Red bloom tree – Amboro National Park

An overlook

An overlook

The still reflection of the trees

The still reflection of the trees

This palm is cool in that it moves. It throws these root arms and drops others. This allows it to move around some. There are conflicting theories as to why it does this but regardless of why, it’s pretty cool.

Walking Palm

Walking Palm

This happy bald spot on the floor of the jungle is a leaf cutter ant trail. They clear the path that they follow “home”. Why are they cutting things down? It’s because they are fungus farmers. They take certain leaves and use them to grow fungus in their nests. They then feed off the fungus. Ants are pretty amazing creatures. These can carry 20x their body weight.

Leaf cutter ant trail - Amboro National Park

Leaf cutter ant trail – Amboro National Park

Two ants working over a leaf

Two ants working over a leaf

Here’s something that is amazing. Ant quality control. Leaves that do not fit the need of the fungus, or damage it, are discarded. Below is a bunch of discarded leaves that did not meet the farming criteria.

Rejected leaves from a leaf cutter ant colony

Rejected leaves from a leaf cutter ant colony

We also saw other animals…

Two Hoatzin Birds on a Branch

Two Hoatzin Birds on a Branch

Alligator in the sun

Alligator in the sun

Butterfly

Butterfly

Blurry Capuchin Monkey

Blurry Capuchin Monkey

Spotted insect

Spotted insect

Wild Frenchmen

Wild Frenchmen

As well as some swinging Jose's of the bronx variety

As well as some swinging Jose’s of the bronx variety

Of course there is plenty of plant life as well. This little furry stalk was glistening in the light.

Fuzzy plant in the light

Fuzzy plant in the light

Leafy vine wrapping itself around a tree trunk

Leafy vine wrapping itself around a tree trunk

Up it goes

Up it goes

Another type of tree hugger vine

Another type of tree hugger vine

Thorny tree bark

Thorny tree bark

Another treehugger

Another treehugger

Climb on!

Climb on!

Red bulb flower

Red bulb flower

Look! Two ants inside the flower!

Look! Two ants inside the flower!

Red bulb flower another view

Red bulb flower another view

White flower

White flower

Looking up at a very tall tree

Looking up at a very tall tree

White fungus growing on a tree

White fungus growing on a tree

Views of water

Small river

Small river

Blue colored section of a river

Blue colored section of a river 

A sandy bank along a river

A sandy bank along a river

Standing in the water looking at the beachy embankment

Standing in the water looking at the beachy embankment

Reflection in the still waters

Reflection in the still waters

Towards the end of our trek we stopped off at a campsite that was not very loved. It had fallen to shambles. The wood was splintered, mosquito netting on the windows had significant holes, and in one area the roof had primitive skylights (holes). There were two elderly gentlemen there that were in the jungle to get treatment for their rheumatoid arthritis from a Japanese healer… You can’t make this stuff up. The treatment was several days of bites from fire ants. I’ve had some of those bites and they are SUPER intense. The men claimed it helped them immensely so who knows, maybe there is something to it. From this camp it was only a 15 or so minute walk back to our camp where we ate, and headed back on our night hike. Unfortunately the night hike didn’t yield any animals and after several hours, we decided to turn in.

 

Not the most loved sign

Not the most loved sign

 

 

One Comment:

  1. My theory and some info
    The fire ant bite is so painful that the people produce enormous amounts of endorphins. Endorphins help with pain. So the treatment makes sense from that point of view. On the other hand those ant bites are excruciatingly painful.
    I wonder if the men had rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. There are about a hundred different types of arthritis. The most common ones are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. People tend to confuse them. When getting up with pain in the morning they might use the common phrase in Spanish speaking countries: “hoy me esta matando la reuma”. Heard it when I was small. Most likely they have osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease.

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